How Addiction Impacts our Finances

How Addiction Impacts our Finances

When we hear the word addiction, whether it’s in a conversation or in a story on the news, we think of drugs, alcohol, gambling, or some other vice that “other” people in our world battle.  We rarely think of addiction as something we personally deal with.  I believe every person engages in some type of addictive behavior, often several, and the financial impact these can have are significant.

Cash or Card?

Cash or Card?

The percentage of people using credit cards as the sole method of payment has increased dramatically in recent years. More than 50% of credit card holders are now using their credit cards for everyday purchases. No doubt the lure of the rewards programs offered by most credit cards today has a lot to do with this trend. What’s yet unknown but predictable is the harm this will have on the financial health of many of these people.

Contentment over compromise

Contentment over compromise

Guest Author: Rachel Rupert

Consumerism is all around us: payment plans, no-interest for the first year, all of these offers and “deals” that convince us to go out and purchase something that, when we look honestly at our bank account and (hopefully) our budget, we can’t really afford. Yet, so many of us buy into it and end up feeling overwhelmed as we face the consequences of an impulsive purchase.

5 ways to reduce cost and be better prepared for retirement

5 ways to reduce cost and be better prepared for retirement

Many Americans are approaching retirement with inadequate savings.  The fear of running out of money in retirement according a study done by Allianz of 3000 baby boomers revealed that 60% feared running out of money more than they feared dying.  How real is this problem and what can you do if you’re approaching retirement in the next 10 years or less?

Questioning conventional wisdom on higher education

Questioning conventional wisdom on higher education

As parents, we hear so much about saving for college and providing a top-notch higher education for our kids.  We’re told a 4-year college degree is a bare minimum required in today’s job market.  We feel the pressure to follow this conventional wisdom, to make sure our kids get into the best schools, so they can have the opportunity to succeed.  But are we right in following conventional wisdom as it relates to the 4-year college degrees that seem to be the standard for higher education?